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    Quotation (or quote¹) marks inside

Quote marks, that are inside other

Quote marks

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What?!²

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Yes, we occasionally deal with language and writing.

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And today’s the day!

So go through the DOOR.

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   [MORE]

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   Consider this passage from Matthew 26:18-19 (NASB)

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…And he [Jesus] said [to His disciples], Go into the city to a certain man, and say to him, The Teacher says, My time is at hand; I am to keep the Passover at your house with My disciples.” ‘ ”  And the disciples did as Jesus had directed them; and they prepared the Passover.

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   Notice that there is a quotation within a quotation within a quotation (among other things³). All quoted material is in blue; all quotation (or quote) marks, in red, appear outside the closing quote marks–unless you’re acting British, watching Jeopardy, or are batching information on your computer.

   The situation above rarely occurs, but when it does, simply start with double quote marks, and switch to single quote marks, and then if necessary, alternate back to double again. Brits do the same; however, they start–usually–with single marks. Note further that English Bibles often treat quote marks in other ways…

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   ¹ Some say using the short form “quote” for “quotation” as an adjective is a blunder. The rule is really a bit fuzzy. We disagree; “quote” makes the sentence snappier.

   ² Some think that (the often overdone) double punctuation here–?!–is bad form; we disagree: often it expresses more clearly the melding of two separate emotions. This can be used in certain fiction to better describe the tone of a scene without using extra words.

   ³ Note here the use of quote marks in other ways; the subtle use of semicolons as “heavier commas” when there are many cluttering internal commas; and the capitalizing of nouns, pronouns, and adjectives that refer to Deity. There’s disagreement, however, on how far to take that kind of capitalization.