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   This book is the foundation for dozens of books on accepting, managing, and working “profitably” with those around you and helping you get along with difficult people–and everyone else.

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   It was written by a once poor man with little formal education, who after quickly achieving great success, hired Charles Schwab, then 38, to work for him for $1,000,000 a year in a time where there was no American income tax and $50 a week was a good salary.

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   When a relative, the mother of two boys far away in college said she couldn’t get a letter of any kind from either of them about how they were doing, the author bet (someone else) $100 he could write them a letter, asking for nothing, and get a reply from them by return mail. He wrote a breezy, but brief note saying he was so proud of them he was enclosing for each a $50 bill to help with their expenses. But he enclosed nothing. By return he received a letter from each telling about themselves…and mentioning, by the way, that he’d accidentally forgotten his enclosure. News gained at no cost.

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   It’s filled with little–fascinating–moments from history.

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   This surprising book, that was revised and added many times, that I paid 50 cents for, is listed on the other side of the DOOR.

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[MORE]

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   The book by Dale Carnegie is called How to Win Friends and Influence People. (Simon & Schuster, 1936–my copy a 1981 reprint.

   This is a delightful bedside book of “lists” that seem so obvious but are forgettable¹, and anecdotes that are richly historical (Washington, Franklin, Lincoln, Robert E. Lee, etc.) that will work their way into your life and bring success.

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   ¹ Other list books of general advice can’t hold a candle to this. (See, I got a footnote in.)