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   “There is a great gulf today between what is popularly known as liberalism and conservatism. Each side demands that you not only disagree with but disdain the other as (at best) crazy or (at worst) evil. This is particularly true when religion is the point at issue.”¹

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   Where can such a wimpy conversation like this go?

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For more use the DOOR.

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   [MORE]

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   (continuing the above…)

Progressives cry out that fundamentalism is growing rapidly and nonbelief is stigmatized. They point out that politics has turned to the right, supported by mega-churches and mobilized orthodox believers. Conservatives endlessly denounce what they see as an increasingly skeptical and relativistic society. Major universities, media companies, and elite institutions are heavily secular, they say, and they control the culture.

   “Which is it? Is skepticism or faith on the ascendancy in the world today? The answer is Yes. The enemies are both right. Skepticism, fear, and anger toward traditional religion are growing in power and influence. But at the same time, robust, orthodox belief in the traditional faiths is growing as well…”

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   These are the opening words to Keller’s book, The Reason for God. Where can such a conversation go? Well, for one thing, the church Keller started with mainly young, busy, educated singles in Manhattan has grown from 0 to 5000.

   We recommend his book. (Again, see note 1.)

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   ¹ This is the opening of Timothy Keller’s The Reason for God: Belief in an Age of Skepticism (Dutton, 2008). Note that these words are ten years old. (Color and boldface above is ours.)