According to Antoine de Saint-Exupery¹,

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   “Love does not consist of gazing at each other, but in looking outward together in the same direction.”

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   Maria Popova² considers this one of “history’s greatest definitions of love.”

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   With all our biases, we’d like to slightly amend that with one adjective and one adverb.

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For that you’ll need to use the DOOR.

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   [MORE]

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      Maria Popova, in a recent blogsite (Sept. 12, 2018–see footnote) presents Shel Silverstein’s picture book, The Missing Piece Meets the Big O, and concludes by astutely mentioning that it reminds her of Antoine de Saint-Exupery’s fine definition.

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Here’s our modification of this (of course, complex) offering:

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   “Lasting love does not consist of always gazing at each other, but in looking outward together in the same direction.”

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   The only real themes in literature today, John Cheever has declared, are love and death³. And love, of course, is an ever-present background theme of most popular literature. The thing that saddens me today is that the expression of what is usually called “love” (between man and woman) is often little more than a brief exchange between persons on one level or another.

   What can I add to this? One idea and two stories. Real love that matters is long love–fill in the details as you wish. This involves recognizing the first “gaze” and never letting it go, come what may regardless of the desirable togetherness “looking outward” that follows. The “always” above subtly implies “some” is always there.

   And is one feature of the “lasting” part.

   The two stories are my Earth Is Not Alone (see sidebar & Amazon) and The Blood of Three Worlds (forthcoming soon). There’s a triangle of young persons involved, and uniqueness and depth of how love is expressed is not limited to the planet world on which it occurs.

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   ¹ Antoine de Saint-Exupery is best known for The Little Prince. He was a popular award-winning French writer and pilot who died in WWII.

   ² Brain Pickings by Maria Popova <newsletter@brainpickings.org> Worth a visit.

   ³ Recalled from Cheever delivering a lecture at SUNY-Oswego long ago. After pondering this for some time, I thought that the “love” and “death” demanded a third theme beside them: “duty” or “oughtness.”

 

 

 

After reading the “Big O” by Shel Silverstein:

 

And here comes Silverstein’s tenderest, most invigorating magic — when the missing piece becomes its well-rounded self, the Big O emerges, silently and without explanation. In the final scene, the two are seen rolling side by side, calling to mind Antoine de Saint-Exupéry’s contribution to history’s greatest definitions of love: “Love does not consist of gazing at each other, but in looking outward together in the same direction.”

 

Brain Pickings by Maria Popova <newsletter@brainpickings.org>

The Missing Piece Meets the Big O

Shel Silverstein (September 25, 1930–May 10, 1999)

Sept. 12, 2018

Add two adjectives: “lasting” and “always”