.

   A devotional thought¹:

.

It’s easy to rattle off attributes of God–omniscient, omnipotent, etc.–

.

but what about omnipresent?

   .

   Other than often saying “God is everywhere,” does the Bible give any helpful details about this?

.

For more use the DOOR.

.

[MORE]

.

   Consider the Epistle of James 1:17 (NASB):

.

   “Every good gift and every perfect gift is from above, coming down from the Father of lights with whom there is no variation or shadow due to change.”²

.

   The existence of “light,” or light energy, is where our understanding of physical matter and energy (itself) begins. Light from the sun “starts everything going” on Earth. It provides all our energy which, as Einstein and others have pointed out, is “connected to” all matter. There’s that famous formula: E = mc² (energy = mass, or matter, times the speed of light squared).

   Light also starts out the first part of the Bible in Genesis: Light erases the “darkness” (which we know best as the “absence of light”). Also in the first 9 verses of John’s Gospel light is mentioned 6 times–one example in v. 5: “The light shines in darkness, and the darkness has not overcome it.” (Yes, there’s generous use of metaphor³ here.)

   Now look at the passage from James. Notice with the “Father of lights” there is no shadow. He is on “all sides” of His creation! Nothing is “sheltered from His vision” or is “hiding from” or secret in His creation.

   With shadows, we all have the possibility of keeping certain things out of sight.

   From everyone but God.

   In other words, God the Father is omnipresent and, by the way, omniscient as well.

_____________________________

   ¹ This is from an open drawer of a file of devotional thoughts. Not a whole lot of spadework here.

   ² Of course, context is usually important in taking the Bible seriously. Here James, according to many the half-brother of Jesus and a key leader in the early church, is giving general instruction and advice in how to face reality and live as a Christian.

   ³ The intermingling of literal and metaphor in the Bible is fascinating to ponder. Metaphor not only sometimes says it better–and Jesus used it all the time–but is often the only way to express physical realities in a primitive world.