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   As a writer, observing the stylistic technique of others can be fascinating.

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   Some things that went down on paper back then would never be allowed in print today like

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huge gaps in narrative sequence that can be jolting.

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Here’s the biggest jump I’ve ever found:

It’s between John 1:5 and 1:6 (in the Bible).

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      Here is John 1:1-5 (NASB):

     “In the beginning was the Word [Jesus], and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He [Jesus] was is the beginning with God. All things came into being by Him, and apart from Him nothing came into being that has come into being. In Him was life, and the life was the light of men. And the light shines in darkness, and the darkness did not comprehend it.

    And here is John 1:6-8 that immediately follows:

    “There came a man, sent from God, whose name was John¹. He came for a witness, that he might bear witness of the light, and that all might believe through him. He was not that light, be he came that he might bear witness of the light.”

   This is an extreme example of in medias res². Who is the world is this John? He has a history elsewhere in the Bible that was written somewhere else. And just what are we to expect to come from all this? What are his credentials? How does this connect to what was just said?

   Such is the nature of much “old” writing that we now highly value. It wouldn’t play in the editorial Peoria today. In contemporary writing that competes with everything else, we demand so much more.

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   ¹ The “John” here is “John the Baptist,” not the apostle John who is writing this.

   ² “In the middle of things.” So much fiction, as well as factual accounts, today begin in the middle of a story to get a reader (or hearer) to stop and buy in. Usually, however, we eventually learn what came before, before the story of account is over. But here the jump into things is pretty dramatic, because the author, perhaps, assumes that the reader (or hearer) is already up to speed on what came before.