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   According to philosopher Roger Scruton,

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“A writer who says there are no truths…is asking you not to believe him. So don’t.“¹

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   So who do we believe about what? Or even entertain ideas that suggest the miraculous?

   Not so easy to answer. Ravi Zacharias, as a student at Princeton was floored by the strength of the evidence for the miraculous resurrection of Jesus.  He sought out the two top New Testament professors at the university about data that could support a miraculous resurrection.  Both were not Christians. One pointed toward a “mass hallucination theory” without conviction in spite of the fact it was riddled with problems, and as a result it had earned no credibility in the scholarly literature. The other professor said that, as a historian, he had no interest in the question. The assumption, of course, was that the possibility was irrelevant to anything that mattered.

   Says Ravi Zacharias, I began to wonder whether G. K. Chesterton was right: “The Christian ideal has not been tried and found wanting. It has been found difficult; and left untried”².

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   ¹ Just Thinking The magazine of Ravi Zacharias International Ministries. (Vol. 25.3  wwwrzim.org). Quoting Roger Scruton, Modern Philosophy: An Introduction and Survey (London: Mandarin, 1996) 6.

   ² JT quoting G. K. Chesterton, “What’s Wrong with the World,” The Collected Works of G. K. Chesterton IV (San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 1987), 62.