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It’s  E=mc².

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   But we’ll have to work a bit–just a bit–to begin to see how it works.

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   That is, to understand such statements as

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   “At the speed of light [c, above] , a zooming mustard seed would outweigh the entire cosmos.”¹

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   For more use the DOOR.

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[MORE]

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   “…Nothing budges unless acted upon by a nearby object or force. Einstein famously showed that the ultimate speed, that of light of light at 186,282 miles per second, imposes a limit of how quickly anything could affect anything else..

   “Einstein explained that nothing with any mass (i.e. that weighs anything) can quite attain lightspeed, because its mass would grow until, for instance, even a feather at just below lightspeed would outweigh a galaxy. And the amount of force needed to accelerate such a huge mass further would be impossible to obtain–it would exceed all the energy in the universe. Indeed, at the speed of light a zooming mustard seed would outweigh the entire cosmos. (This change of ‘weight’ that automatically accompanies speed was part of Einstein’s first, special relativity theory of 1905. It happens because motion always involves energy, and energy and mass, he said, are two sides of the same coin. They’re equivalent, as per his famous E = mc², where E is energy and the m is the object’s mass [and c, the speed of light]. So if you increase an object’s inherent energy by increasing its speed, you’re also increasing its equivalent mass.

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   ¹ From Robert Lanza, Beyond Biocentrism (2016) ch. 7, footnote 3. Bracketed info added.

   ² The nearly complete footnote 3 from the source above. Color and boldface added.