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A concept hinted at in the previous post is

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Occam’s Razor.

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For more there’s the DOOR.

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   [MORE]

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   Occam’s razor |ˈäkəmz|(also Ockham’s razor )

   The principle (attributed to William of Occam) that in explaining a thing, no more assumptions should be made than are necessary. The principle is often invoked to defend reductionism or nominalism.

   Compare with principle of parsimony (at parsimony).

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   [Again, we've fiddled a bit with this Oxford Online definition.]

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   This is a principle, or concept, often bandied about that’s worth pondering. First, nearly everything–in science, religion, or philosophy–is foundationally based upon certain assumptions. For example, in science it’s assumed that matter and energy is so consistent and predictable that experiments can be repeated over and over giving same, or same kind of results.

   But does this have to be? A lot in our lives depend on that assumption!

   But how far can we take it before we leave science and and enter religion with its own set of assumptions?

   We exercise faith in many things we take for granted.

   How can reduce the number of assumptions with “harder” facts when opportunity arises?