–In 1994, we had no evidence for any planets beyond our solar system.

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   –In 1995, we discovered our 1st exoplanet¹.

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   –By March 2015, more than 1900 exoplanets had been confirmed.

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   The scope of our place in the world has dramatically changed in the last 20 years. We now know so much more about what’s beyond our solar system. If there are more planets, it’s logical to ask is: “Are there possibly any other humans in places beyond our solar system?”

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   In his Improbable Planet: How Earth Became Humanity’s Home¹, Christian astrophysicist Hugh Ross has this to say:

   “In 1995, with the first discovery of an extrasolar planet, speculations about extraterrestrial life–or at least about an abundance of potential life-sites–ran wild. At the time, most astronomers (and others) presumed that extrasolar planets would, to a large degree, mimic the planets in our own solar system, where one in eight teems with life. Surely, they surmised, life on other planets must be out there, given that life sprang up so quickly and enduringly on Earth.

   “As of March 2015, astronomers have detected, confirmed, and measured (at least with respect to their orbital properties) more than 1,900 extrasolar planets. Thus far, however, none of these extrasolar planets shares characteristics in common with any of the Sun’s eight planets…”

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   Realize that this is a summary statement, and yes, it’s a bit dated. Astronomers are learning more and more each day about parts of the universe far beyond us.

   More on that at another time. Our main point here is to provide a source for information that’s still pretty new to most people. We, by the way, heartily recommend Hugh Ross’s writings which can be found the website of Reasons to Believe [ reasons.org ].

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   ¹ “Exoplanet” and “extrasolar planet” mean the same thing. The information cited for this article comes from Hugh Ross, Improbable Planet: How Earth Became Humanity’s Home (Baker Books, 2016, p 234). The specific science article Ross draws from is Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz, “A Jupiter-Mass Companion to a Solar-Type Star, Nature 378: 355-59. We also recommend Ross’s Why the Universe Is the Way It Is (Baker Books, 2008), and if you have both books, read “Why” first.