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   According to Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel¹,

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   “There are few ideas in the world of thought which contain so much spiritual power as the idea of the Sabbath.”

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   With few exceptions, modern Christians have ignored and discarded the 4th² of the 10 commandments.

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For more there’s the DOOR.

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   The purpose of this post is to create awareness of the commandment to honor the Sabbath day, not to discuss its history–how it’s been defined, been “changed,” and in effect discarded.

   And to make you aware of a book¹.

   Keeping the Sabbath–perhaps done by Jews in a hundred different ways–is a hallmark tradition of Judaism. The basic idea, however, is to stop and rest. Christians, for the most part, do anything but that. When Christians want to post the 10 commandments on the courthouse or schoolroom walls, they are serious about just 9 of them. But God long ago declared that following all of the “big 10″ rules were important.

   To quote Heschel: “All week long we are called upon to sanctify life through employing things of space. On the Sabbath it is given us to share in the holiness that is in the heart of time. Even when the soul is seared, even when no prayer can come out of our tightened throats, the clean, silent rest of the Sabbath leads us to a realm of endless peace, or to the beginning of an awareness of what eternity means.”

   Heschel says much more. But that’s enough for here.

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   ¹ All quotes in this post come from THE SABBATH: its meaning for modern man. Along with several others, The Rev. Richard John Neuhaus, editor-in-chief of First Things strongly recommends this book.

   ² In some listings of the 10 Commandments, the one about the Sabbath is the 5th one.