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   Over the weekend¹ 17 more are murdered in the city of Chicago.

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   This means more than 600 homicides have taken place this year

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just in Chicago.

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   There’s also and ancient account of 18 being killed.

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For more about the risks of life on Earth, use the DOOR.

 

[MORE]

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   “Chicago: At least 17 people were killed and more than 40 others were injured in shootings since Friday in the nation’s third-largest city, marking the deadliest weekend in what has been the city’s most violent year in more than a decade.

   “There’s already been more than 600 homicides in Chicago this year. The city is tallying murders at a rate not seen since the late 1990′s in the midst of violence fueled by the crack cocaine epidemic.

   “Police and Mayor Rahm Emanuel have blamed the current spike in street violence on increased gang activity  and gun laws that they say aren’t strong enough to deter convicted felons from carrying and using weapons.”¹

.   .   .   .   .

   “[T]hose 18 who died when the tower in Siloam fell on them–do you think they were more guilty than all the others living in Jerusalem?” said Jesus (Luke 13:4)

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    How do we look at the causes of death on Earth? Are they accidental or can they be avoided? In the Jesus quote from 2000 years ago we presume He’s asking a rhetorical question that suggests that “accidents and death happen regardless of people’s behavioral past.” (If an “evening out for fairness” sake seems necessary, then remember that, according to Jesus, there’s a long hereafter.) Should those who let themselves be so near to a possibly poorly constructed building be blamed for making that risky decision? That seems to be pushing things too far.

   But explaining life in Chicago seems to ask for other reasons. Since every life matters, solutions to this American horror calls for change–some kind of change that will not just paper over the guilt of those who live in the same country, but farther away.

   Nor should the regulations for weapons and crime be exactly the same everywhere–especially in areas where problems with human behavior are entirely different.

   Thinking of individuals–and smaller numbers–sometimes makes a problem seem more relevant.

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   ¹ This article, written by Aamer Madhani, appeared in Florida Today that came from USA Today during the first week of November 2016.