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OK

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   It started as a joke in 1839–and ended up, according to National Geographic¹, one of the most commonly used words in the world.

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   And while, with its double-capital correctness, it’s not in the official Scrabble wordlist, it landed in the Oxford Online Dictionary.

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For more use the DOOR.

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[MORE]

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    The same as “okay.” Its uses: As a(n):

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   Exclamation    expressing satisfaction, success, or agreement.  OK, I give in.

   Adjective     satisfactory, but not exceptionally good. The flight was OK.

   Adverb     in a satisfactory manner or to a satisfactory extent.  The computer continues to work OK.

   Noun     authorization or approval.  He gave us the OK.

   Verb     [OK's, OK'd]  to sanction or give approval to.  The governor OK’d the man’s execution.

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   “OK” was first printed in a Boston newspaper in March 1839. Caught up in a fad for whimsical misspellings and abbreviations, the editors indicated that a statement was all correct by using the first two letters in “ill korrect.” By 1840 “OK” had gone national, even used by Martin Van Buren’s presidential campaign. His nickname was Old Kinderhook.

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[Added later: Note comments about "ill" below. I've retained my error (above) to illustrate my point.]

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   ¹ According to Margaret G. Zackowitz writing for National Geographic  (Oct 2014). Text slightly modified as well as OED definitions.