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[Note: Our next post, 2 days from now, will--probably--be a rare political one.]

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   America’s “border problem” has been bandied about largely ignoring, I feel, an issue that’s easy to overlook:

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Of the 32,000 refugees who in 2015 gained citizenship in 28 countries 81% (or 25,900 of them¹) ended up in

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Canada.

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   That’s a country I, from the USA, once briefly visited by kayak²…

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[For more use the DOOR.]

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[MORE]

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   We have a long, long northern land border that doesn’t lend itself to a wall or serious fence. And most people don’t realize that bilingual Canada has the second-largest French-speaking city in the world, Montreal (quite cosmopolitan btw), only a few miles from our³ northern border. And the fact that Americans, in the north-half of the U.S. anyway, are for the most part are die-hard monolingualists (English, of course), while many Canadians are seriously bi-lingual (using the language that works best at the moment) can feign not understanding and complicate exchange between countries.

   A wall or “hard barrier” of our northern boundary is not practical.

   It’s not difficult for determined individuals to head south.

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   ¹ The Risk Report in “The World’s Dispossessed,” data from year 2015 assembled and written by Ian Bremmer and Tara John in Time, July 4, 2016.

   ² In 1973 I crossed the St. Laurence Seaway in a kayak to see if it could be done. It could. I could have easily headed inland through the woods. I didn’t, however.

   ³ Sorry, Alaska, to overlook you here…