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   Some strange words A Dozen Seconds can’t resist:

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    This one’s from the 18th century (check your OED).

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         floccinaucinihilipilification

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“More” requires the DOOR.

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[MORE]

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   Yes, It’s a noun. Here’s the way to pronounce it according to the OED:

fläksəˌnôsəˌnīˌhiləˌpiləfiˈkāSHən

   

   Its definition:  “the action or habit of estimating something as worthless. (The word is used chiefly as a curiosity.).”

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   Its origin:  “mid 18th cent.: from Latin flocci, nauci, nihili, pili (words meaning ‘at little value’) + -fication. The Latin elements were listed in a well-known rule of the Latin Grammar used at Eton College, an English public school.”

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   Let us neologize¹ for the sake of a brief comment: This terribly constructed word holds in bondage a useful concept that could benefit from exposure to daylight. Presto! Behold a substitute:² “floccunate (v), floccunate or floccunating (n)³”

   Now, examples of usage from our present world, underlying ideas we’ve explored:

   Ex. 1  Some atheistic scientists automatically engage in floccunating about the value of traditional religions today.

   Ex. 2  Some Christians, with or without records collected by scientists,  floccunate about the value of radiometric dating.

   Conclusion: The big, real word we started with is not useful. Our new words are right behind it. Don’t trouble your minds with them. But…but if you hear them later, remember you heard them here first.

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   ¹ “Neologize” means create a real new word; neologize, itself, is an old real word.

   ² Don’t miss the handy use of colons here!

   ³ These three words (in boldface) are not real–yet–beyond this post.