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First, dogs do not sweat through their tongues.

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But they do sweat like humans.

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What?

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For more use the DOOR.

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[MORE]

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   Dogs need to regulate their temperature just like humans. When it’s hot or Fido is extra vigorous, he opens his mouth and pants. But this does mean that –technically–he’s sweating. Although dogs don’t have sweat glands under their arms, they do in fact sweat. Sometimes you see a trail of wet paw prints behind an over-heated dog. That’s because the dog is sweating from its footpads. A layer of thick fur covers the rest of a dog’s sweat glands. The fur acts an an insulator between the hot environment and the skin, just like a vacuum in a thermos. However once a dog overheats, that fur keeps the heat from escaping so he finds another way to cool off.

   “A dog pants when he is active or hot. With his mouth open, the moisture on his tongue evaporates. Panting allows heat from the inner thorax, the hottest part of the body, to escape through evaporation through the mucous membranes on the tongue, mouth and throat. Sweat on humans works the same way–evaporation from the sweaty moisture on our skin lowers our body temperature.

   “So even though canines do not actually ‘sweat’ through tongue, as myth would have it, the evaporation has much the same effect.”

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   [This information was adapted from Popular Science: Mistakes and Hoaxes, 100 Things Science Got Wrong (p.66).]