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   Timothy Keller¹ sees it this way:

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   “Three generations ago, most people [in the U.S.A.] inherited rather than chose their religious faith. The great majority of people belonged to one of the historic, mainline Protestant churches or the Roman Catholic Church. Today, however,

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   “Today, however, the now dubbed ‘old line’ Protestant churches of cultural, inherited faith are aging and losing members rapidly. People are opting instead for nonreligious life, for a non-institutional, personally constructed  spirituality, or for orthodox, high commitment religious groups that expect members to have a conversion experience. Therefore the population is paradoxically growing more religious and less religious at the same time.”

   Therefore to answer the question posed: “[D]oubt and belief are each on the rise, our political and public discourse on matters of faith and morality has become deadlocked and deeply divided.”

   We’ll look at what happened in Keller’s own experience in our next post.

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   ¹ Timothy Keller, The Reason for God: Belief in a Age of Skepticism (Dutton, Penguin Group, 2008). Here taken from Kindle electronic version. Keller starts off looking at both sides of the field before weighing in. This book is a reasonable and readable apologetic for the Christian faith.