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(Not to be confused with Scientology)

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“Scienceology” goes like this:

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(1)  In the beginning, Bang…

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For more use the DOOR.

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[MORE]

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   If you’re confused about science and all its complications, here’s a quick overview. To pack this together, we’ll start over and just hit the high points.

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   (1)  In the beginning there was a great big “bang.”

   At the start of everything, simple, very tiny bits of stuff existed. They were unbelievably small. Before the “start” we just have to guess what existed. Now think of a Four of July cherry bomb¹ (the size of a marble). All by itself this “cherry bomb” exploded in all directions.

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   (2)  According to a concept we call “time,” this happened about 13.8 billion years ago.

   We have observations, numbers, and regular “patterns” that have been discovered and created that can be used to argue for this value² and for thinking about the sequencing of events that occurred after this “start.”

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   (3)  Over time, on their own, many little bitty things that exploded at the beginning became attracted to, and joined to, each other and became stars, suns, and planets.

   Some of this attraction we can explain and define by using more numbers. On our own planet Earth we have become quite skillful in explaining, comparing, applying, and predicting these “attractions.”

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   (4)  Over time, on their own, many little bitty things joined together and became bigger more complex things.

   Many parts became what we call atoms and molecules. (Yes, but let’s not get too technical.)

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   (5)  Some of these bigger things we call “gases” (like carbon dioxide), others “liquids” (like water), and still others “solids” (like granite, sandstone, trees, and people).

   Of course many of what we call solids, like those listed, are mixtures of things including gases and liquids. Naturally occurring liquids and gases are also mixtures to some extent as well.

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   (6)  On their own 4 types of bigger stuff came to be:  (a) stuff that just sits there or mindlessly flits, blows, or swishes around like air, sand, or water; (b) stuff that operates like a “factory” and pretty much sits in one place like trees; (c) stuff that operates like a factory and can move around on its own on land, water, or in the air like animals and birds; and (d) that special kind of “c” that walks around on two legs and can sit around computers and type these words.

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   (7)  There is no beyond the universe “outside action” or purpose to anything mentioned above that’s ever happened, that concerns science.

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   SOME GENERAL QUESTIONS FOR SCIENCE, FOR THOSE WHO THINK SOMETHING IMPORTANT IS MISSING HERE:

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   1.  What about with living things (6 b and c above) and their bold attempts to survive and propagate? Why do they have this urge?

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   2.  How should we think about what might have come before the beginning?

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   3.  How can we explain how, or why, everything happened the way it did?  Why did everything become for complex, varied, and eventually able to type these words without getting destroyed?

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   4.  How can one explain the love, hopes, fears, expectations, and drive to learn more that humans bring to their part of the world?

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   5.  What is the difference between “There is no action from beyond the universe” and “There is no action from beyond the universe that concerns science?”

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   6.  If science falls short, or leaves us unsatisfied, where else should we look?

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–More in a future post–

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   ¹ A “cherry bomb” is a crude example. Note, too, that the action of energy here only hides in the shadows. Most scientists would suggest a much smaller object than a marble that would contain everything that came from the initial explosion. If the beginning stuff was always there, or from some part of a “multiverse,” remember most of this is purely speculation. (Quarks, less so ; ) )If you present this in the sixth grade, expect to be asked, “Who lit the fuse?” A bit higher up it would be “Where are the quarks, qubits, and strings?”

   ² The “13.8 billion years” varies a bit here and there, but nowhere does it approach 10,000 years.