.

A minor observation from Luke 7:

.

Jesus marvels, and steps out of the agenda

.

…that I would have planned for Him.

 

[Yes, this requires the DOOR.]

.

[MORE]

.

   On the way to his next stop, Jesus gets a message from a Roman centurion.  [A politically powerful soldier not "chosen," from the seed of of Abe, Isaac, and Jacob as far as we know.]

   He has a slave.  [Offends our educated notion of treating fellow humans.]

   He values him, however.  [Good for him (and "he").]

   The slave is sick and dying.  [Sad. Good help and possibly friendship will be lost.]

   The centurion sends religious leaders (in this case, Jewish elders) to find and bring Jesus to heal him.  [This gets the ball rolling.]

   The leaders tell Jesus 3 things: The centurion (a) is worthy, (b) he loves the “nation” (the Jewish “nation,” presumably), and (c) he built their synagogue. It appears that Jesus doesn’t know this. [Jesus in the flesh had certain limitations.]

   The centurion is somehow keeping an eye on everything.

   While Jesus, agreeing to come, is partway there, the centurion sends friends to tell Jesus not to come any farther because he is not worthy for Jesus to come “under his roof.” According to the centurion, all Jesus has to do is “say the word” and the slave will be healed.

   Jesus, with a crowd following him, marvels at this news.

   Jesus says to the crowd [who obviously heard the news, too], “I say unto you, not even in Israel have I found such great faith.”

   End of incident.  [Jesus apparently stops his sudden trip down a "rabbit trail" and continues on his planned way.]

   The centurion’s messengers return to their master. The slave is healed and in good health.  [A quiet, but happy ending.]

   End of narrative.

   Did the centurion hear about how to “be saved”?

   Doesn’t say.

   Did he walk the “Roman Road,” with its 4 points on how to come to a lasting, saving faith?

   Nope. The “Roman Road” hadn’t been written yet. And besides, the person who wrote that (Saul who became Paul) was probably boiling about everything that was going on, or would be when he heard about it.