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What about…

 

51515

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And…what does  51015,  51115,  51215,  51315,  51415,  51615,  share with it?

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Yes, it’s again the DOOR for more…

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[MORE]

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   [First, three provisos: (1) With calendar dates done the "American way" the sequence is month, day, and year. (2) Single digit numerals on the calendar are not typically preceded by zeros. (3) When most are at home with the century they're in, they refer to years by their last two digits. These assumptions apply here…]

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   With that give-away, it’s easy to see that these 7 5-digit numerals apply to the current week that ends tomorrow.

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   Furthermore, these numerals (we’ll call them “numbers”) are are palindromes [acc, to the OED, are are words, phrases, or sequences (here numbers) that read read the same backward as forward, e.g. "madam" or "nurses run"] which in softer moments we’ve discussed before. Such entire weeks are rare. The next two occur in June of 2016 and August of 2018.  The last one occurred in the 3rd week of April 2014.

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   Not to overlook:  5115 is also a palindrome. Individual calendar palindromes are easier to come by–just not a whole week of them together. The key to finding them is the last digit in the year date. This year it’s the 5th month, May. Next year it will be June, the next July, and so on. Often in the special month there are ten palindromes (The 1st day, the 10th day and the “teen” days). In 2020 there are none at all; in 2021 it gets trickier…

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   Where did this all come from?  A conversation two days ago from a special friend that said the structure of this week was very special. Thank you, S. H. It was fun to lighten up!