.

Sext” and “sexting“?

.

Six Comments and One Source

 

.

For more use the DOOR (and you don’t have to close it behind you).

.

MORE

.

   First, since definitions and comments are all over the place here, I’m giving only one source, a recent article featured on the Nov. 2014 cover of The Atlantic.

.

   (1)  First, some definitions:

(a)  “sext” — (n) a liturgical service forming part of the Divine Office of the Christian Church at the sixth hour of the day.

(b)  “sexting” — (n or v)  the act of sending sexually explicit messages, often as, or with, nude or semi-nude photos, primarily between mobile phones. Often “sext” (pl, “sexts”) is used to refer to such messages.

.

   (2)  (a) (above) is a legitimate Scrabble word; (b) is not (at least as of this writing).

.

   (3)  The sexual use of these words began in about 2005.

.

   (4)  “Studies” have shown that anywhere from 20% to 70% of middle schoolers and high schoolers who have mobile phones have engaged in sexting. Many, many “personal,” or “private” sexts by one way or another get shared on the Internet to dozens, hundreds, and thousands of people. Depending upon the state in which a person lives, explicit sexting–by a sender as well as a “model”–is considered a felony, and conviction of such a felony can easily follow and person for the rest of one’s life.

   (5)  Sexting has resulted in humiliation, bullying, suicide, and many “local horrors” in many regions one would never expect. Outsiders are usually unaware of the extent of this due to laws that protect minors.

.

   (6)  How did I get interested in this? I was passing by a newsstand and saw the Nov. 2014 Atlantic, featuring “Why Kids Sext: And What to Do About It” by Hanna Rosin, who spent several days interviewing students, teachers, and police in Lousia, Virginia, where sexting had recently got out of hand. This is a fine article that quickly gives a feel for how this problem got out of hand–in a high school out in the middle of nowhere.

 

.

   Beautiful Louisa Virginia is 30-some miles from Richmond and Charlottesville. A calm, backwater southern town where nothing really happens. Years ago I taught chemistry there, and recently during a visit back for old time’s sake, I discovered the majestic old building I worked in was at the epicenter of a 2011 earthquake–no earthquakes ever there before or after. The large two-story brick building had to be torn down.

.

   The principal gave me a souvenir brick to take home…