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   “Stop your novel and DON’T DO A POST!¹” comes a voice from the Kitchen to the man at the Top of the Tower. “And with your next post, keep it simple and interesting.”

.

   “Why not a post?” returns the Tower.

.

   “Son #2 and his family will arrive in an hour-and-a-half,” answers K. “And I have some things I want you to do!”

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   “They will?!²” replies T. His eyes grow larger.

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   “And that’s not all…” adds K.

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   [For more use the DOOR.]

.

[MORE]

.

…………………………………… “Son #3 and his family will arrive in two days, and there’s even more I want you to do.”

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   “Really! Any more surprises?” returns T.

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   “As a matter of fact there is³,” replies K. “Son #1 and his family have already arrived and are downstairs.”

.

   “Whenever was that?”

.

   “Four days ago.”

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¹ Writing tips: Using boldface and or all CAPITAL letters in writing dialogue is sometimes called “screaming” and is considered by many to be amateurish, a poor substitute for more exacting word choice and timing. Sometimes I violate this in my fiction partly because I consider many of my stories to be candidates to be read aloud, and the use of a few other excesses such as Note 2 (below) to aid an oral reader.

² Double punctuating is almost always bad news, but “?” and “!” used together to me efficiently expresses both confusion and surprise.

³ “A matter of fact” is a tired cliché that can sap energy and cloud clarity of good narrative. Yet, since it is common in everyday speech, it can be accurately used in fiction and/or journalistic reporting, to realistically portray certain characters. (Rarely, though, to describe someone fusty like me.)