Death is

inconvenient…also.

.

On 5 separate occasions

in 7 weeks

the ending of a life

has caught me by surprise.

.

4 deaths were

sudden and totally unexpected.

.

For more use the DOOR.

.

[MORE]

.

   First, none directly involved my family. It involved friends or the families of friends. The ages of the last 4 ranged from 38 to 64. None got up on their last morning realizing it was their last morning.

.

• A personal friend and colleague now inTennessee died of cancer (not unexpectedly).

• A next-door neighbor took a fatal fall off an attic ladder, his head hitting the corner of a worktable.

• From our Scrabble group a regular player drove into a head-on auto collision.

• The 38-year-old nephew of a close friend suddenly fell and couldn’t be revived. Cause unknown.

• The younger biking brother of a bicycling friend, who was a former NFL football player, was hit by a car.

.

   Ecclesiastes 3:2 reminds us, there’s “a time to be born and a time to die.” The first time is fixed by a marker; not so the second until after it happens. That’s the way it is. There probably was important “unfinished business” in the last four of the five lives (above). I look in the mirror and remind myself, “The wise man lives each day prepared–as prepared as he can be–to leave the world as well as to “settle” and be at peace with family and friends who are still in reach.”

   That includes mending any torn fences with God, and getting to know Him better, and serving Him, as well as sharing ourselves with others.

   I put off too long going to Tennessee to see my friend with cancer.

   Today’s a good day to consider such things¹.

__________________________________

   ¹ Written the day after Memorial Day, 2014.